Understanding Pica

What is Pica?

Pica is a condition that causes people to eat non-food substances that have no nutritional value and some that can actually be harmful to them especially in substantial amounts.  It can affect children and adults alike of either gender at any age and be linked to both physical and mental health conditions.  People with pica will still eat a normal diet in addition to the non-food substance that they crave, and it can go undiagnosed if they eat non harmful items like ice.  It’s believed to be relatively common, but experts aren’t sure as research studies can have different definitions of the condition, and many cases go unreported.

Causes

There isn’t a single known cause for developing pica, but there are several things that can lead to its development.  It’s believed that anaemia, caused by iron deficiency in pregnant women can cause

High costs means kids are missing out on healthy food

Will Boddington /

fruit vegies1

Kids in childcare are not being fed enough fruit, grains and veggies according to a Geelong study of menus in 18 Victorian centres.

A Deakin University study found only one met nutrition guidelines, while over a third were not offering enough fruit.

Lead author Audrey Elford, said it was concerning that only one of the childcare centers in the study met food standard guidelines.

“We know there is a concern among childcare providers that ‘healthy menus’, which include more fruits and vegetables, will cost more because of the rising cost of these foods,” Ms Elford said.

“Many people also believe that healthy food will just be wasted because of a mistaken belief that children prefer to eat less healthy food options.”

The study’s found the rising cost of healthy food is making it harder for childcare centered to offer enough fruit.

Ms Elford said

‘I Lost 190 Lbs. In 3.5 Years By Making These Healthy Food Swaps And Getting Into Running’

My name is Faith Sloop (@trainingforamazing), and I am 23 years old. I live in Cleveland, Ohio, and I am a content creator. Competing on The Amazing Race became my goal and motivation. It pushed me to start incorporating more nutritious foods into my diet and running every week. I’ve lost 190 pounds.

Before my current weight loss journey, I counted calories, restricted, and watched my weight for as long as I can remember. Growing up low-income and busy (I wanted to be in every club), cheap fast food was most of what was accessible and convenient.

All my life I had been in the diet cycle—restricting and binging—over and over. By the time I was 16, I had gained and lost the same 10 pounds what felt like a million times. After a certain point, I stopped weighing myself.

I remember during my freshman year of college,